Tag archives: activist

Activists knocking on the door

The Canadian Real Estate sector may be in for a shake-up. Reuters recently reported (here) that activists may be eyeing real estate investment trusts (REITs), and their approximate combined C$67 billion in market capitalization, as ripe targets for activist campaigns in light of: attractive prices, vulnerability in the market based on uncertainty surrounding the effects … Continue reading

The drivers and consequences of settlement agreements in proxy fights

Activist interventions are being increasingly resolved by way of settlement agreements, with 3% of activist interventions in 2000 having resulted in a settlement agreement versus 16% in 2011.[1] In light of this emerging trend, the Columbia Business School recently published a paper, Dancing with Activists, in which the authors sought to provide the first systematic … Continue reading

Members of Special Situations team weigh in on Canadian activism in Ethical Boardroom Magazine

Members of Norton Rose Fulbright’s Canadian Special Situations team have weighed in on shareholder activism in Canada with an article in the Spring Edition of Ethical Boardroom Magazine. The article, written by Trevor Zeyl (assisted by Joe Bricker), offers insights on shareholder activism in Canada in the past year, and some predictions for 2017 and … Continue reading

2014 Q3 Proxy Update

The 2015 proxy season is fast approaching, PwC and Broadridge released a quarterly research report  which reviews proxy related data from 4,113 shareholder meetings held between January 1 and June 30, 2014 and  highlights several themes and trends that may inform how shareholders and companies will interact on four key issues: Director Elections: Director elections continue to attract widespread … Continue reading

Defensive Tools in Shareholder Activism: The “Voting Pill”

In today’s Financial Post,  Barbara Shecter highlighted the use of modified shareholder rights plans (colloquially known as “poison pills”) as an emerging defensive tool against opportunistic shareholder activism in Canada.  Traditionally, poison pills are used by boards of target companies as defensive tools to guard against unsolicited takeover bids.  By expanding the typical definition of … Continue reading
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