Tag archives: proxy battles

A UK dispute sheds light on the duties of a dissident director

A recent decision of the UK’s High Court — Stobart v Tinkler [2019] EWHC 258 (Comm) — has been released following a dispute between directors of a large infrastructure company (the “Company”). The decision, and the circumstances preceding it, serve as a cautionary tale about the duties of a dissident director and of board members in the context of proxy contests.

The board dispute was initiated by a founder and significant shareholder of the company (the “Dissident Director”). After his resignation from the office of CEO in 2017, the Dissident Director remained with the Company as … Continue Reading

Defamation lawsuits as a defence to shareholder activism

Activist investors engaged in proxy fights typically mount aggressive public relations campaigns in order to undermine shareholder confidence in a target company’s performance and leadership, whether through social media, online forums or by using the more traditional PR channels. In response, target companies have turned to a number of defensive measures, many of which have been previously discussed on this blog. As part of their proxy defence playbooks, target companies may threaten or actively pursue legal action, such as by filing complaints with securities regulators or by suing for defamation.

Naturally, the decision to commence legal action must take into … Continue Reading

The drivers and consequences of settlement agreements in proxy fights

Activist interventions are being increasingly resolved by way of settlement agreements, with 3% of activist interventions in 2000 having resulted in a settlement agreement versus 16% in 2011.[1] In light of this emerging trend, the Columbia Business School recently published a paper, Dancing with Activists, in which the authors sought to provide the first systematic analysis of the drivers, nature, and consequences of such settlements. The authors identified 4 main drivers of settlement agreements: (1) the activist’s stake; (2) market reaction to a SEC Schedule 13(d) filing; (3) settlements in past engagements; and (4) past firm performance.… Continue Reading

Shareholders Shaking Up Japan

A Japanese research firm suggests that there may be a record 14 shareholder proposals (all with the intention of creating higher returns) that will be made in the next few weeks as annual general meeting season begin in Tokyo and elsewhere.

Why is this surprising? In the past it has been uncommon for shareholders in Japan’s institutions to oppose company resolutions. Activists were considered ‘bad guys.’ What has changed this dynamic is the creation of the Stewardship Code (the “Code”) under the tutelage of the economically driven Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. In force since May, it already has been followed … Continue Reading

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